Catarina de Albuquerque

Catarina de Albuquerque

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  • Amy says:

    Attn: Catarina de Albuquerque re: your concerns about Sacramento, California Sanitation – a major issue!

    Please read what I wrote to the Sargeant at The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District.
    You may not know this is happening, and it is a very serious problem. Read on.

    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District is responsible for dumping roughly 140 million gallons of inadequately treated wastewater every day into the heart of the Delta, the state’s most important and most troubled estuary. To put it into context, the Sacramento region is the single largest source of treated sewage discharged to inland waters in the entire state. Sacramento’s regional sewage treatment plant is also the largest single source of ammonia in the Delta. In fact, the ammonia load has more than doubled since 1985 due to rapid urbanization. It now exceeds 14 tons per day and more than 125,000 gallons each month.

    All people have to do is walk outside, or leave their windows open and they smell it, they feel it in their bodies, this is real and it is going to come back and bite your facility especially if Washington jumps in on this and they will. You cannot deny the truth. So stop lying to the people, I mean that is sad.
    ——————————————

    Attn: Sac Waste Treament Plant and Corporate Sargeant. Sharon,

    I am in shock that your facility has filed to be relieved from fixing a HUGE problem in the entire sacramento region!
    Every time I walk outside no matter where I am at in Sacramento, Folsom anywhere, it always smells
    like human feces, dead animal smell, and cleaning products and why do you think that is? Because YOU
    will not fix a serious issue which is spewing shit, piss and ammonia all over Sacramento! I have health
    issues I could not figure out why i could not heal for 17 years and I blame YOU! Sacramento in the past 9 years has
    gotten so bad in smells it is unreal.

    How in the hell do any of you wake up everyday and look in the mirror when you are literally killing people
    without them knowing it. So many have no idea what the smell is, but I will make sure they do. This is like living in a third world country
    and you are worried about the almighty dollar, not human safety, every one of you should be ashamed of yourselves!!!!

    Ammonia is a serious thing especially constantly inhaled and so are human bacterial infections caused by inhaling human contaminants constantly
    without being relieved of this. we are never relieved of this huge burden!!! I am going to make sure everyone knows what that smell really is with fliers, emails
    everything. You have to pay to get that facility fixed, that is wrong if you don’t, and thanks for making me lose 17 years
    of my life due to bacterial infections I have not been able to get rid of, and yes I tested for them, I know it is your fault.

    ————————————————– ————————————————– ——————————————-

    This information is for Sacramento, Roseville, Auburn, all cities to read the truth about The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District,
    and to notify you that Sacramento could care less about your health!!! Do something people, stand up!!! Read below people! And Sacramento is trying to weezle
    their way out of to save a buck and not care about our air quality or rivers, delta and children, animals, produce, I could go on and on!!
    Wonder why you have Lupus? Wonder why you have AutoImmune Diseases you cannot pinpoint? Wonder why your body cannot heal itself no matter what you do or take? Wonder why you have heart disease, allergies
    and headaches everyday and you still do the right thing with nutrition, water drinking etc, here is your answer the seriously bad third world country
    Sacramento bacteria ridden sesspool of constant inhalation of ammonia and human feces right at your doorstep everyday!!! THIS IS A SERIOUS PROBLEM
    WITH A HUGE COVER UP!

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District is responsible for dumping roughly 140 million gallons of inadequately treated wastewater every day into the heart of the Delta, the state’s most important and most troubled estuary. To put it into context, the Sacramento region is the single largest source of treated sewage discharged to inland waters in the entire state. Sacramento’s regional sewage treatment plant is also the largest single source of ammonia in the Delta. In fact, the ammonia load has more than doubled since 1985 due to rapid urbanization. It now exceeds 14 tons per day and more than 125,000 gallons each month.

    Multiple studies have shown that these discharges have adverse effects on the Delta habitat, specifically ammonia discharges, which have significantly affected native Delta fish populations. The increased discharge of ammonia in Delta waters has been extremely detrimental to the food web that delta smelt rely upon. The United States Fish and Wildlife Services’ biological opinion for Delta water project operations has stated that a reduction of contaminant levels and exposure to toxic algal blooms (which increase with high ammonia levels) are key to promoting the recovery of delta smelt and other native fish populations.

    Water quality regulators have required other cities, such as Stockton and Modesto, to upgrade their treatment systems by installing tertiary systems to clean sewage discharges to the Delta. And, tertiary treatment is standard.

    Water agencies say estimated cost for Sacramento system upgrade too high
    Sacramento Business Journal by Michael Shaw, Staff writer
    Date: Friday, October 29, 2010, 2:47pm PDT – Last Modified: Friday, October 29, 2010, 3:08pm PDT

    An association of public water agencies is challenging an estimate that upgrades to Sacramento’s water treatment system will cost more than $2 billion, as claimed by the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District earlier this year.
    The water agencies said Friday the $2 billion estimate is 53 percent higher than an independent cost estimate commissioned by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. The board has proposed a more stringent discharge requirement for the Sacramento district, which serves more than 1 million users.
    The sanitation district, meanwhile, is fighting proposed changes in its new discharge permit, saying the costly upgrades will cause sewer rates in the Sacramento region to triple.
    “It appears as if Sacramento Sanitation is deliberately exaggerating costs to drum up opposition to its much-needed facility upgrade,” said Laura King Moon, assistant general manager for the State Water Contractors. “This issue deserves an informed public discussion based on the real issues of Delta health and realistic estimates of sewage treatment upgrades that communities throughout the state are already paying.”
    The group said Sacramento sanitation is one of the few remaining wastewater plants in the region that isn’t utilizing modern treatment methods.

    Science is behind discharge permit
    Reader input
    Re: “Unelected board could hike our sewer rates,” Folsom Telegraph, Feb. 2.

    In her recent op-ed, Sacramento County Supervisor Roberta MacGlashan did a great disservice to her constituents and Telegraph readers by choosing to ignore the facts behind the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board’s approval of the Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant’s new operating permit.

    She claims the permit is based on an unproven hypothesis about the harmful effects of the plant’s discharges on the Delta, but experts from every major entity overseeing the Delta, including the Delta Stewardship Council, Department of Public Health, Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Environmental Protection Agency testified in support of the science and the permit.

    The Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant is responsible for 99 percent of ammonia discharged to the Delta.

    All regulatory entities, outside of the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District and their paid consultants, agree that these discharges are extremely harmful to the Delta food-web.

    All other major sewage dischargers in the Delta are already tasked with meeting similar treatment standards.

    Sacramento’s sewage treatment upgrades are long overdue and necessary.

    It’s hard to believe that MacGlashan could sit through 14 hours of testimony and still not understand the facts, but, then again, she is an elected official.

    Michael Boccadoro, Coalition for a Sustainable Delta, Sacramento

    ——————————————-
    Ok people this is gross!!! Read on and seriously bad…

    The latest on California politics and government April 26, 2011 Bill to sell Sacramento wastewater clears Assembly committee Sacramento’s sewage district could sell treated wastewater to help cover the cost of upgrading its sewage treatment plant under legislation that cleared its first legislative hurdle Tuesday. Assembly Bill 134, by Democratic Assemblyman Roger Dickinson of Sacramento, passed the Assembly’s Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee by a vote of 9-1. The measure is part of a dual strategy, by Dickinson and Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, that calls for selling wastewater and securing $50 million in state bond funds to help upgrade a capital local sewage treatment plant. The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District faces costs of up to $2 billion to comply with conditions of a strict new wastewater discharge permit for its treatment plant near Elk Grove. Wastewater is treated at the Elk Grove plant before it is pumped into the Sacramento River. AB 134 would allow the finished product to be sold as urban drinking water or irrigation water for farms. AB 134 now goes to the Assembly Appropriations Committee. PHOTO CREDIT: Sacramento regional wastewater treatmentplant, Dec. 5, 2010, in Elk Grove. Paul Kitagaki Jr. / Sacramento Bee Categories: Bills (2011-2012 session)

    ——————————————-

    Water agencies say estimated cost for Sacramento system upgrade too high

    Sacramento Business Journal by Michael Shaw, Staff writer
    Date: Friday, October 29, 2010, 2:47pm PDT – Last Modified: Friday, October 29, 2010, 3:08pm PDT

    “We have been a responsible environmental steward and we’ll continue to be responsible,” Somavarapu said.
    The permit is up for review and comment with the Water Quality Control Board. (Ok what? You are now trying to get off the hook for having to clean up the Ammonia and feces? You crooked evil money hungry vindictive horrific people!)

    http://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2010/10/29/Water-agencies-say-estimated-cost-too-hi.html

    http://sustainabledelta.com/SacRegionalFeature.html

    UPDATE: Water Board Approves Long Overdue Upgrades to Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant
    On December 8, after a lengthy public hearing that went late into the night, the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board unanimously voted to adopt a permit, with a 5-0 vote, calling for the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District to significantly clean up its wastewater discharges into the Delta. The Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant is the largest discharger of ammonia in the Delta, which, along with pathogens and other contaminants, has been a major threat to fish, the food web and human health in the estuary. The permit calls for the District to treat its discharges to a much higher level for these pollutants, consistent with other major urban dischargers.
    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District is responsible for dumping roughly 140 million gallons of inadequately treated wastewater every day into the heart of the Delta, the state’s most important and most troubled estuary. To put it into context, the Sacramento region is the single largest source of treated sewage discharged to inland waters in the entire state. Sacramento’s regional sewage treatment plant is also the largest single source of ammonia in the Delta. In fact, the ammonia load has more than doubled since 1985 due to rapid urbanization. It now exceeds 14 tons per day and more than 125,000 gallons each month.
    Multiple studies have shown that these discharges have adverse effects on the Delta habitat, specifically ammonia discharges, which have significantly affected native Delta fish populations. The increased discharge of ammonia in Delta waters has been extremely detrimental to the food web that delta smelt rely upon. The United States Fish and Wildlife Services’ biological opinion for Delta water project operations has stated that a reduction of contaminant levels and exposure to toxic algal blooms (which increase with high ammonia levels) are key to promoting the recovery of delta smelt and other native fish populations.
    Water quality regulators have required other cities, such as Stockton and Modesto, to upgrade their treatment systems by installing tertiary systems to clean sewage discharges to the Delta. And, tertiary treatment is standard technology employed in wastewater treatment systems throughout the state. The permit adopted for Sacramento’s treatment plant by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board will place the same type of requirements on Sacramento’s discharges. “The proposed permit significantly reduces potential impacts from the District’s discharge and will ensure protection of public health, aquatic health and the environment,” said Pamela Creedon, executive officer of the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Board.
    Wastewater discharge is just one of the many stressors affecting the Delta ecosystem and the native species it supports, but recent research suggests that it could be a principal driver behind the recent pelagic organism decline. When layered on top of the proliferation of invasive species, agricultural and urban runoff, predation, water diversions, and ocean harvest, it undoubtedly contributes to the crisis in our most vital estuary. The Sacramento wastewatertreatment plant is uniquely situated to help solve at least one of these factors contributing to the Delta’s ills, and regulators needed to take this opportunity to aid the ailing estuary.
    “The Delta has serious ecological problems. All waste discharges to the Delta must be carefully evaluated and any threats to delta water quality eliminated,” said Creedon. “It is time to move the District’s treatment process into the 21st century before allowing it to discharge more wastewater s to our vitally important Delta, which provides drinking water to over 23 million Californians, serves as a prime recreation area, and is habitat to many rare and endangered species.”
    The upgrades to Sacramento’s wastewater treatment facility to reduce harmful discharges will not solve all of the Delta’s problems, but it is one important step toward meeting the co-equal goals of ecosystem restoration and water supply reliability.

    The latest on California politics and government April 26, 2011 Bill to sell Sacramento wastewater clears Assembly committee Sacramento’s sewage district could sell treated wastewater to help cover the cost of upgrading its sewage treatment plant under legislation that cleared its first legislative hurdle Tuesday. Assembly Bill 134, by Democratic Assemblyman Roger Dickinson of Sacramento, passed the Assembly’s Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee by a vote of 9-1. The measure is part of a dual strategy, by Dickinson and Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, that calls for selling wastewater and securing $50 million in state bond funds to help upgrade a capital local sewage treatment plant. The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District faces costs of up to $2 billion to comply with conditions of a strict new wastewater discharge permit for its treatment plant near Elk Grove. Wastewater is treated at the Elk Grove plant before it is pumped into the Sacramento River. AB 134 would allow the finished product to be sold as urban drinking water or irrigation water for farms. AB 134 now goes to the Assembly Appropriations Committee. PHOTO CREDIT: Sacramento regional wastewater treatment plant, Dec. 5, 2010, in Elk Grove. Paul Kitagaki Jr. / Sacramento Bee Categories: Bills (2011-2012 session)

    Read more here: http://blogs.sacbee.com/capitolalertlatest/2011/04/bill-to-sell-sacramento-wastewater.html#storylink=cpy

    Science is behind discharge permit
    Reader input
    Re: “Unelected board could hike our sewer rates,” Folsom Telegraph, Feb. 2.
    In her recent op-ed, Sacramento County Supervisor Roberta MacGlashan did a great disservice to her constituents and Telegraph readers by choosing to ignore the facts behind the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board’s approval of the Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant’s new operating permit.
    She claims the permit is based on an unproven hypothesis about the harmful effects of the plant’s discharges on the Delta, but experts from every major entity overseeing the Delta, including the Delta Stewardship Council, Department of Public Health, Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Environmental Protection Agency testified in support of the science and the permit.
    The Sacramento Wastewater Treatment Plant is responsible for 99 percent of ammonia discharged to the Delta.
    All regulatory entities, outside of the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District and their paid consultants, agree that these discharges are extremely harmful to the Delta food-web.
    All other major sewage dischargers in the Delta are already tasked with meeting similar treatment standards.
    Sacramento’s sewage treatment upgrades are long overdue and necessary.
    It’s hard to believe that MacGlashan could sit through 14 hours of testimony and still not understand the facts, but, then again, she is an elected official.
    Michael Boccadoro, Coalition for a Sustainable Delta, Sacramento

    Water agencies say estimated cost for Sacramento system upgrade too high
    Sacramento Business Journal by Michael Shaw, Staff writer
    Date: Friday, October 29, 2010, 2:47pm PDT – Last Modified: Friday, October 29, 2010, 3:08pm PDT
    Related News
    • A flood of projects in the pipeline
    • New law will help local sewer district avoid massive rate hikes
    • Special: Utility – Central Utility Plant
    • Bill to reduce cost of upgrading treatmentplant opposed
    • Dickinson, Steinberg bill aims to allow Sacramento County Regional Sanitation District to sell wastewater
    An association of public water agencies is challenging an estimate that upgrades to Sacramento’s water treatment system will cost more than $2 billion, as claimed by the Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District earlier this year.
    The water agencies said Friday the $2 billion estimate is 53 percent higher than an independent cost estimate commissioned by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board. The board has proposed a more stringent discharge requirement for the Sacramento district, which serves more than 1 million users.
    The sanitation district, meanwhile, is fighting proposed changes in its new discharge permit, saying the costly upgrades will cause sewer rates in the Sacramento region to triple.
    “It appears as if Sacramento Sanitation is deliberately exaggerating costs to drum up opposition to its much-needed facility upgrade,” said Laura King Moon, assistant general manager for the State Water Contractors. “This issue deserves an informed public discussion based on the real issues of Delta health and realistic estimates of sewage treatment upgrades that communities throughout the state are already paying.”
    The group said Sacramento sanitation is one of the few remaining wastewater plants in the region that isn’t utilizing modern treatment methods.
    But the Sanitation district on Friday said it stands by its estimates, which were performed by Carollo Engineers of Walnut Creek, which has worked with the district for decades.
    “They have provided testimony supporting those estimates,” said Prabhakar Somavarapu, director of policy and planning at the sanitation district. He said the outside entities the water agencies are citing have not worked with the district, have no local expertise, and likely relied only on public documents in forming their cost estimates.

    Water agencies say estimated cost for Sacramento system upgrade too high
    Sacramento Business Journal by Michael Shaw, Staff writer
    Date: Friday, October 29, 2010, 2:47pm PDT – Last Modified: Friday, October 29, 2010, 3:08pm PDT
    Related News
    • A flood of projects in the pipeline
    • New law will help local sewer district avoid massive rate hikes
    • Special: Utility – Central Utility Plant
    • Bill to reduce cost of upgrading treatmentplant opposed
    • Dickinson, Steinberg bill aims to allow Sacramento County Regional Sanitation District to sell wastewater
    (Page 2 of 2)
    “We have been a responsible environmental steward and we’ll continue to be responsible,” Somavarapu said.
    The permit is up for review and comment with the Water Quality Control Board.

    Letter to the president of U.S.

    Mr. President I am in dire need to write this critical letter to you about California, especially the health of it’s Capitol Sacramento. Please help! I have been very ill for years and wondered why and was told it was all in my head. I have infections that won’t heal and a virus that won’t go away, and now I know why. Every time I step outside it smells like feces or moldy stench air and I thought it was farms and cow smells. But it has been our toxic waste water plant on the Delta emitting harmful pathogens to our food, air and water, how could this be happening, it feels like I live in a 3rd world country what the hell is this? People want to save money and let people die?? They will NOT fix this toxic plant, OMG! Read these articles please asap… I mean it, this explains the stench smells… http://sustainabledelta.com/SacRegionalFeature.html

    http://www.bizjournals.com/sacramento/news/2010/10/29/Water-agencies-say-estimated-cost-too-hi.html

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